The Beginning Process of My Last Article-Yarn Bombing in Savannah

I wanted to document my process of researching and writing an article.

Here are the first notes I had concerning YARN BOMB:

FIRST: It was lots of photos and getting to know the women and of course, how to crochet. I did not tell anyone except Jessica, the coordinator of this event, about the article.

SECOND: It was typing whatever conversation i heard on the eve of the Yarn Bombing. I wanted this process to be organic. the week before I approached the situations from a journalist view and alerted the women that I would be asking questions for The Inkwell and they clammed up. I vowed to find another approach. I decided to sit and listen and hear is what I heard:

Savannah’s FIRST EVER Crowdsourced YARN BOMB

Dialog on Yarn Bombing eve:

SO THERE IS ALSO A SIGN POST IT’S ON THE FRONT

ALSO BIKE RACKS

ALL THEY NEED IS THIS>>YOU GO IN AND TWINE

AND SO WE CAN MAKE IT

left over squares for the bike rack

so this is the other panel

to make them not curl

I wonder if the best thing is do it this way< opposites

the weight of one do the opposites

these are so pretty

so I have yarn< needles and twine

so this panel is done

8 x 5

The rest will be extra

Start stitching those together by the 5’s.

This is one. The other one needs to be put together

We need rows.

I have needles

I did not bring scissors

Sorry about that ya’ll

like the way they go together

Try to make it mix matched

Once you get the concept it is so east

This is great I love it

Dom you want us to sew things together

Mom

Okay, so, she’s gonna cast off

Put your stuff down

I have more needles

So pissed I don’t have scissors

What do you need?

Two strips

Can I just take this twine in this basket?

Yes that is what is for.

I want to know that I’m doing my best.

Make sure everyone is reinforcing the corners really well.

What’s the location again?

YES!!

Green truck!!!!

I’m really excited!

He went to matt to use the old sign as a public art project

Can I just take this over?

Would you please?

I love it I’m so happy

Show me how to do this

Here is this. And you need some twine

Did I give you the needle already?

Thread the needle and do it first

Half way there with secure knot

Make it look pretty

And then you just sew this together

Try and get them to line up as much

9×9 squares

Sew these up

Special care on the corners

Matt co

Sub project of SeeSAW..see savannah art walls

An organization

Hebehmale..matt
he’s currently during a huge mural for scad

Matt is trying to inspire

Public art very passionate about it

“When you are out and you see some something unexpected on a wall, it makes you think differently about where you live. Makes you think they are mischievous people out there that want to take life creatively.”

Mix these up….sew them in rows of 8

So 3 of these together will be the post

2 of 8 for right now for bike rack.

Any idea what you want to work on next?

Everything I write is from personal

Working at connect get the journalistic out there, but I have my own…

The odd size ones needs to be on their own

Is the other panel almost done yet?

It’s so soft

Check out this square that Trisha made

Do you want me to do squares or sew

Attach them to what?

To each other

Here is another 5×3

That’s awesome Sandi

THIRD: It was the first idea page…thoughts of what order the article will flow”

November 22, 2013

 

Thoughts for the flow of the paper.

With sewing needles ad yarn in hand, the women of savannah just united for this event were scurrying around connecting the last twine to its designated spot around Green truck. (Straight with the end and roll back around)

Public art has become….

History of public art in savannah

Get around to Mark and it was his idea…he had the space available. Quotes from Mark about public art and what it means to him. This event and current future or past events. Any info he would like to add

He invited Jessica to use the space

She wanted to yarn bomb something for a while

Quotes from Jessica about her association with connect and the love of public art, yarn bombing…etc

History of yarn bombing in savannah

Then back to Jessica and how she coordinated the event

Facebook, etc

Then different memories I have about the first meeting…WELL

Tell of history-now friends-swapping numbers taking pix

Then the last meeting, the excitement

Meeting at 6 in the morning with doughnuts…

And then we have made full circle.

MATT:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Matt+Hebermehl&qpvt=Matt+Hebermehl&FORM=VDRE#view=detail&mid=890C6B5133943B1D8873890C6B5133943B1D8873

http://savannahartwalls.org/

SeeSAW (See Savannah Art Walls) is a Savannah, GA based art organization with the goal of synthesizing local art, commerce and civic participation through contemporary public art thereby creating opportunities for Savannah and its creative community to engage in a global cultural dialogue.

Friends and collaborators Matt Hebermehl & James “DrZ” Zdaniewski co-founded SeeSAW in 2011. Under the banner of SeeSAW, Hebermehl and Zdaniewski worked with Ellen Harris of Savannah’s Metropolitan Planning Commission to create a mural ordinance and policy after public works of art on private property were arbitrarily buffed by the city and/or resulted in illegal signage citations for property owners. At that time there was no way to formally apply to paint a mural on private property. Savannah’s celebrated historical preservationnecessitated a mural application process in order to facilitate SeeSAW’s goal of creating a culture of contemporary public art in Savannah.  The first iteration of the mural policy was approved in late 2011, under that policy SeeSAW successfully petitioned for a designated mural wall at 34th and Habersham Street, the first wall of its kind in Savannah. The policy went through several reviews over the course of 2012 and a final version was approved and officially implemented into city planning by Savannah’s City Council in January of 2013.

The mural policy and application form can be found on the Metropolitan Planning Commission’s website: Mural application form 

Beautiful end quote

November 22, 2013

 

Thoughts for the flow of the paper.

With sewing needles ad yarn in hand, the women of savannah just united for this event were scurrying around connecting the last twine to its designated spot around Green truck. (Straight with the end and roll back around)

Public art has become….

History of public art in savannah

Get around to Mark and it was his idea…he had the space available. Quotes from Mark about public art and what it means to him. This event and current future or past events. Any info he would like to add

He invited Jessica to use the space

She wanted to yarn bomb something for a while

Quotes from Jessica about her association with connect and the love of public art, yarn bombing…etc

History of yarn bombing in savannah

Then back to Jessica and how she coordinated the event

Facebook, etc

Then different memories I have about the first meeting…WELL

Tell of history-now friends-swapping numbers taking pix

Then the last meeting, the excitement

Meeting at 6 in the morning with doughnuts…

And then we have made full circle.

FOURTH: Research Research Research. I also made phone calls and emails to people I would like quote from.

MATT:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Matt+Hebermehl&qpvt=Matt+Hebermehl&FORM=VDRE#view=detail&mid=890C6B5133943B1D8873890C6B5133943B1D8873

http://savannahartwalls.org/

SeeSAW (See Savannah Art Walls) is a Savannah, GA based art organization with the goal of synthesizing local art, commerce and civic participation through contemporary public art thereby creating opportunities for Savannah and its creative community to engage in a global cultural dialogue.

Friends and collaborators Matt Hebermehl & James “DrZ” Zdaniewski co-founded SeeSAW in 2011. Under the banner of SeeSAW, Hebermehl and Zdaniewski worked with Ellen Harris of Savannah’s Metropolitan Planning Commission to create a mural ordinance and policy after public works of art on private property were arbitrarily buffed by the city and/or resulted in illegal signage citations for property owners. At that time there was no way to formally apply to paint a mural on private property. Savannah’s celebrated historical preservationnecessitated a mural application process in order to facilitate SeeSAW’s goal of creating a culture of contemporary public art in Savannah.  The first iteration of the mural policy was approved in late 2011, under that policy SeeSAW successfully petitioned for a designated mural wall at 34th and Habersham Street, the first wall of its kind in Savannah. The policy went through several reviews over the course of 2012 and a final version was approved and officially implemented into city planning by Savannah’s City Council in January of 2013.

The mural policy and application form can be found on the Metropolitan Planning Commission’s website: Mural application form 

Yarn Bombing in general?

http://www.billdavenport.com/yarnworks/yarnworks.html

Bill Davenport:Yarn works 1993-99

In 1993 I was taught to crochet by Delfina Vannucci, who had learned from Italian nuns when she was a girl. Being left-handed, I never learned to knit very well , and crochet, with it’s ability to be added onto anywhere, lent itself to the complicated sculpture I wanted to do. I originally thought of it as a new type of ultra-thick paint.

http://www.magdasayeg.com/about.html

http://design-milk.com/shes-crafty-yarn-bombing-pioneer-magda-sayeg-knitta/

wrapping that first stop sign pole just felt right

 

Biggest Yarn bombing savannah?

OMG-article found by Jessica, the same girl who oversaw this project:

http://www.connectsavannah.com/savannah/yarnbombs-away/Content?oid=2175465

another article:

http://www.scaddistrict.com/blog/2013/02/12/yarn-bombing-brings-cheer-to-the-mundane-objects-that-surround-us/#.Uo-MWMQ3u3I

http://www.scaddistrict.com/

 

http://mentalfloss.com/article/51583/14-street-art-terms%E2%80%94illustrated

Jul 10, 2013 – A stylized name or signature done with various materials, such as a ….The lines between graffiti, street art, and public art have begun to blur.

13. YARN BOMBING

Olek

In 2005, Magda Sayeg knitted a cozy for a doorknob at her Houston boutique, and spawned a movement. Since then, knit bombers have covered statues, buses, signs, trees, grocery carts, telephone poles, benches, and other objects both sentient and non. Also called “grandma graffiti,” yarn bombing brings an element of domesticity into the streets, counterbalancing the traditionally male world of street art with a traditionally female art form.

Read the full text here: http://mentalfloss.com/article/51583/14-street-art-terms%E2%80%94illustrated#ixzz2lOZTsecv

Public Art?-look above…above ya head..and pray

Public Art in Savannah?

Found a contest and then found the results.

http://www.emergentstructures.org/submit-a-proposal-public-art-at-savannah-gardens

It’s my seesaw guy!

http://savnh.com/post/15677737304/savannah-public-art-its-a-muralcle-at-34th

 

***Need to get Green Truck’s thoughts on the Yarn Bombing…Who is the owner?

Somebody who works there

And a customer

FIFTH:

Take a break. By this point I’m feeling a bit inspired, overwhelmed and foggy. As we all know, it’s a great idea to let all this information we just ingested to simmer around until the creative juice brims over.

SIXTH:

FIRST DRAFT

SHOW ME THE NUMBERS FOR HUMAN INTEREST STORIES & ESPN OWNS FOOTBALL

Now I will begin my blog from another set of lecture note.

 

Aug 26, 2013

Online Media Class Lecture:

 

                       

***Contact news editor this week and CC the Prof.

Drives the entire approach to journalism: does the public know what TheY wants.

They have to make money so why do they print those certain stories.

Editorial decisions that drive stories.

Wag the dog.. we can get easily manipulated to focus on other things even though other stories are just as important.

Had to be a good story teller back in the day. Didn’t need college education.

Protect the little people (no money) bc we are the majority. The 1% of the rich folks hold the cards. We need to keep our eye on them.

***Show him some numbers about how the human nature stories are not as interesting.

Simple stories and make them interesting

Probably be a good idea to really know who your audience is and hire more of those people  bc they have a way in and/or knowledge on the topic.

Easy stories-murder, celeb suicide..of course we are going to run those stories.

Walden-homeless people/freedom to stay homeless

***Does ny times are they for or against the Egyptian military coo? My opinion from the headlines.

****Muslim brotherhood

Does an editorial bias slide in there somehow?

***ESPN partnership with taking over colleges.  It was all of them now it’s narrowed down to Louville.

Morris Hates apple.

Okay. I am going to go against the grain (actually the instructions for the blogs) and do a little research for this one.

I remembered in class you asked us to show you the numbers on hbuman interest stories. There was also some debate about if they were interesting or not and some of thse students voiced their poisons, but they had no real evidence. That is when you asked us to show you some numbers as you saw in my notes above. I did come home that day and did a little research on that topic, but soon became distracted with my on human interest life.

Today, I will search to find your answer. I do enjoy researching. After that, I will look for an article about ESPN owning the colleges.

RESEARCH

First part of my research I just googled Human Interest. This came up:

http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-a-human-interest-story.htm

Much news is focused on presenting facts and statistics, which may get a little boring unless someone has a keen interest in the subject. While people may be very interested in the latest presidential polls, something that may cause cancer, a food recall, or what the weather will be like tomorrow, news sources like newspapers, magazines and television shows may also want to put a “human face” on the news by covering a story more in depth. Sometimes called the story behind the story or an emotional news story, the human interest story may look at news in a more personal way, especially by interviewing people affected or creating a report on one or several people facing challenges that have been covered in the news. The goal is to engage us emotionally in presentation of the news.

It’s common to see at least one human interest story on a nightly news broadcast or in a morning newspaper. A newspaper might be covering home foreclosure rates and have an article that deals with statistics regarding them. To flesh out this story and offer greater coverage, it might then feature an article on a few people in the neighborhood who are experiencing a home foreclosure. Emphasis would be on the personal effects of such a difficult experience, and would be likely to raise readers’ understanding about how the “facts and numbers” on home foreclosure were really working in their community.

 

A human interest story doesn’t have to be deeply moving, and it may be added more for entertainment value. A news story about a presidential candidate’s favorite vegetable or his or her daily workout really isn’t “news” in the traditional sense. Other stories that can make it into the news may be unrelated to news content and provide a needed break from the “if it bleeds it leads” style of journalism. For instance, Anton the Amazing Squirrel who has learned to build with dominoes, might be added as a story that adds levity to a broadcast or newspaper that primarily covers murders, dangerous statistics, and reports on the negative aspects of the country.

 

Okay. A few things that pop up that you did tell us to look for. This article is giving me lots of so called facts, things that would seem likely, but there are no numbers or sources to back up his conclusions. This is purely a fluff story.

However, the article helped me understand why these stories might be used. I never even considered having an angle when publishing a human interest story. I just assumed they were picked out of a bag of stories, but the media could defiantly provide a specific story to influence the community. Very interesting.

I will now look and try to find numbers. Solid proof that these stories are less interesting.

This was a bit interesting: http://www.owenspencer-thomas.com/journalism/newsvalues. It was more of a classroom chapter site, but the information was relevant.

Then I stumbled across this gem. http://shorensteincenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/soft_news_and_critical_journalism_2000.pdf

Hmm, published in 2000.

You have said this in class before “Evidence also suggests that soft news and critical journalism are weakening the foundation of democracy by diminishing the public’s information about public affairs and its interest in politics”

“We will argue:

 That hard news and not soft news is the reason why most people pay attention to news;”

Notice on page 2, (left bottom) what they intend on proving ……RIGHT!!

They are going to prove that hard news is more interesting. Although the information may be 13 years old, here are the numbers you were looking for.

Page 13-Young Adults: Why They Don’t Care Much About News or Politics.

Page 14-Protecting the Watchdog Role. “Americans believe that press skepticism is an

important factor in keeping politicians from

abusing public office.”

I found that incredibly interesting. I hope you did too.

Moving on to ESPN bc I did not know they owned colleges.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/25/sports/ncaafootball/college-footballs-most-dominant-player-its-espn.html

College Football’s Most Dominant Player? It’s ESPN

Wow. That is quite an intense article. It doesn’t surprise me. Everything is big business.

Check this site I found:

http://www.whatyoupayforsports.com/2013/08/espn-college-football-chilling-effects/

Now this is great. This article references the intense NYT article.

“ESPN might control college football today, but that control comes at the cost of its journalistic efforts. Disney and its shareholders aren’t about to let ESPN risk losing billions in subscriber fees and advertising money by reporting on the modern gridiron game’s inherent health risks. ESPN’s reliance on college football for TV programming practically prevents it from publicizing this story — which suits the NFL just fine, thanks.”

 

 

 

 

After 11 Years in Prison, Skakel Goes Free on Bail

Hello Professor. I have recently been bit blocked on how to approach my blogs. I have started about 10 now and have not completed them. I actually had an email typed out to send to you asking for more ideas. I then realized is should use my lecture notes and apply that days lecture information to an article, so here we go.

I have read the lecture, pretty funny notes….

I am selecting this:

  1. Truth-
  2. First loyalty is to the public-

The essence of journalism is verification.

  1. Must maintain an independence from those that they cover.

I am going to pick a random article and apply these ideas to it.

Aug 12, 2013-Lecture Notes

Prof. Morris

Intro to Print and Online Media

 

What should news cover?

Sept 21st..bootcamp for inkwell

Attend at least one class

www.tonymorris.org/aasu/jour3200/overview.htm

what is bellicose (demonstrating aggression and willingness to fight) & querulous (complaining in a petulant or whining manner)?

What are the opinions of the news?

Bias news?

We are already bias, so how do we gauge the news?

Elements of news writing and

Main txt-elements of journalism-2 books

Red/white

Gray and white/blue

Journalism goes, democracy goes. The fear is this.

10 principals that support journalism:

Should provide people w information so that they can self-govern

  1. Truth-
  2. First loyalty is to the public-

The essence of journalism is verification.

  1. Must maintain an independence from those that they cover.
  2. Monitor of power. Holding people accountable. Who keeps the powerful accountable? Accountable to the obligations of their office. i/e: Weiner ..the press/media keeps him accountable by keeping the public informed.

Look at the movies and determine if the fictional president is D or R.

What is getting monitored? Prof Morris thinks everybody should be monitored.

News should monitor power.

  1. News is supposed to make news interesting. i/e:Water plant in savannah? Do we need it? (Fictional topic)
  2. Must strive to make it interesting.
  3.  
  4. It must keep the news comprehensive. Polls.

9.

10. Can an independent press survive or not?

Lecture:

International Wire Service.  Tracking over 300 employees bc they were trying to find out how one employee got some info.

Can we trust the president? Hell no.  look at the photo they selected of the president. Not an accident. New York Times. National Security Agency

 

Should we trust the rich and powerful? No

First amendment ..freedom of press/speech. Practice their beliefs.  A market place of ideas. Got to let them battle it out. Don’t shut down Rush L. we need to hear all opinions. If we silence people then we give them more power. We need them to be out in the open so we can see what they are doing.

Journalists in Syria are lost. Kidnapped.

Back to syllabus:

Grading scale:

Articles for the inkwell-3

In class exercise

Blog for class-needs web address…critiquing news-100 pts.

Final essay/portfolio and self-critique 

Get digital subscription to NYTimes-student and wall street journal. Use these sources for the blog!

Everything should be typed and printed. No handwritten work turned in.

Got hit the deadlines!

Go to Ink Well asap for articles to write about.

tonyraymorris@gmail.com—–blog address

Destiny-study buddy

Minimum of 12 weeks. 24 entries.-find a story and follow it on both sources. And then compare the two. Is there a difference on how they cover it? Why did one pick a certain angel? Look at the words used to describe. Words have subtly meaning. “controlling” used in Obama article. Why did they use that word?

Bruicifed and newsbusters –fun sites.

1-7 look for

Tools for writing

Read chapter one. EOJ-write a response.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Truth– can the author provide the true details and present them to the reader and the reader will believe what he is being told is the bottom line, the absolute, the truth? “This ‘journalistic truth’ is a process that begins with the professional discipline of assembling and verifying facts.”

And “…identifiable sources dedicated to verifying that information and putting it in context.”

  1. First loyalty is to the public-The writer needs to stay unbiased at all times rather his own biases or that of a person or company he is affiliated with. “While news organizations answer to many constituencies, including advertisers and shareholders, the journalists in those organizations must maintain allegiance to citizens and the larger public interest above any other if they are to provide the news without fear or favor.”

The essence of journalism is verification.

  1. Must maintain an independence from those that they cover.-Wouldn’t this be a lot like #2?

Independence of spirit and mind, rather than neutrality, is the principle journalists must keep in focus.” And “In our independence, however, we must avoid any tendency to stray into arrogance, elitism, isolation or nihilism.”

http://www.journalism.org/resources/principles-of-journalism/

 

ARTICLE I SELECTED:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/22/nyregion/skakel-is-ordered-free-on-bail.html?ref=todayspaper&_r=0

               After 11 Years in Prison, Skakel Goes Free on Bail

STAMFORD, Conn. — After spending more than a decade behind bars for the murder of a teenage girl in Greenwich, Conn., Michael C. Skakel, a cousin of the Kennedys, was ordered free from prison on Thursday to await a possible retrial.

Christopher Capozziello for The New York Times

 

Judge Gary White of Connecticut Superior Court in Stamford set bail at $1.2 million, ordering Mr. Skakel not to leave the state without permission and to wear a tracking device. The bail hearing came after another judge ruled last month that Mr. Skakel did not receive a fair trial because his first lawyer, Mickey Sherman, had not represented him effectively, depriving him of his constitutionally guaranteed right to counsel.

As Judge White made his announcement, friends and relatives of Mr. Skakel burst out in applause. Mr. Skakel, dressed in a suit and blue tie , tapped his chest as he walked out of the courtroom. Shortly after 2 p.m., he emerged from the basement of the courthouse and embraced supporters in enthusiastic bear hugs. He stood silently while his lawyer spoke to the throng of reporters outside before being whisked away in a waiting car.

—-Interesting choice of words. I understand this guy is a big fella, but this just added a little underlying bias. Even though he is speaking about their embrace, you can almost feel the love in the air. Also, is there any signafigance to saying what color his tie is?—–

 

Hubert J. Santos, Mr. Skakel’s current lawyer, declined to publicly reveal where Mr. Skakel would go once he was released. His brother John Skakel, who lives in Portland, Ore., provided bank checks to cover the bail.

It was the latest twist in a case that has fascinated the public and confounded investigators since 1975, when the battered body of Martha Moxley, 15, was found beneath a tree in her family’s backyard, pieces of a broken 6-iron golfclub by her side.

Mr. Skakel, 53, was also 15 at the time of the murder, and the two were neighbors in a town that has long been a bastion of wealth. At different times, both Mr. Skakel and his brother Thomas were suspected of killing Ms. Moxley. But it was more than a quarter of a century before Mr. Skakel was tried and convicted. In 2002, he was sentenced to 20 years to life in prison.

The judge who ruled last month, Thomas A. Bishop of Superior Court in Rockville, wrote in a scathing 136-page decision that Mr. Sherman failed to show an attention to detail, lacked a coherent strategy and “was in a myriad of ways ineffective.” Those failures, he wrote, led to a “conviction that lacks reliability.”

After the ruling, Mr. Santos filed a motion for his client to be released on bail. In a later hearing, Judge Bishop decided that the question of whether to grant bail belonged with the criminal court in Stamford, where Mr. Skakel will be retried if the state decides to go forward with another prosecution.

From the outset, the case has attracted national news media attention, offering a potent mix of power, money and sex. It inspired a made-for-television movie, and became a staple for tabloids and an unending source of interest for true-crime writers, particularly Dominick Dunne.

Mr. Skakel is the nephew of Ethel Skakel Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy, and the link to one of America’s most famous families fueled additional interest in the case.

His trial in 2002 lasted three weeks and revealed tawdry details about his life as a young man, including his drinking and his drug use. In his defense, Mr. Skakel acknowledged that on the night of the murder, he had climbed a tree and masturbated while trying to look into Ms. Moxley’s bedroom.

During the trial, the prosecution painted Mr. Skakel as an emotionally disturbed man who was consumed with guilt after the killing, prompting confessions and suicide attempts. In one particularly vivid example cited in court documents, a man employed by the family as a gardener described how Mr. Skakel once tried to jump off the Triborough Bridge after saying that “he had done something very bad, and that he needed to get out of the country, and that he had to kill himself.”

Mr. Skakel has always publicly maintained his innocence.

Throughout the trials and appeals, Mr. Skakel’s family has fought fiercely on his behalf,spending millions of dollars in various bids to win his freedom.

On Thursday, the prosecutors did not object to the setting of bail, just the amount. Mr. Santos suggested $500,000; John Smirga, the lawyer for the state, recommended a number closer to $2 million. Among the factors he wanted the judge to consider were the brutality of the murder, and Mr. Skakel’s resources, character and mental condition.

Mr. Santos dismissed the notion that his client could flee if he wanted to, given the notoriety of the case. “His is the most recognized face in America,” he said. “So he’s not going anywhere.”

At a news conference outside the courthouse on Thursday, Ms. Moxley’s mother, Dorthy, and brother, John, expressed disappointment at the decision but confidence that Judge Bishop’s decision to overturn the conviction would be reversed by the state’s appeal.

“We knew this day would come, so I wasn’t completely destroyed,” Mrs. Moxley said, adding “There’s a lesson to parents: If your child does something wrong, face up to it.”

Mr. Santos used the bail hearing to once again criticize the original prosecution of Mr. Skakel. He said the case had been weak and was based on hearsay.

“If the prosecution found a homeless guy at a train station” who claimed that Mr. Skakel confessed to the murder, Mr. Santos said, “he would be on the stand in a New York minute.”

Mr. Smirga defended the handling of the case but also noted the difficulties of prosecuting a crime so long after it took place.

“Each time the facts of this case are presented, they mutate,” he said. There was no single piece of evidence — like DNA, an eyewitness or a photograph — that could be used against the defendant, he said.

He compared the case to “a giant jigsaw puzzle,” but one without a picture to show what it is supposed to look like when all the pieces are put together. Mr. Smirga said he was confident the state solved the puzzle and vowed to continue in its appeal of Judge Bishop’s decision to vacate the conviction. “His lawyer was found ineffective,” Mr. Smirga said. “But he hasn’t been found innocent in any forum.”

—I like that sentence. I like that he paraphrased it with quotes around the most important part. That to me proves the truth is there. It is right in your face wrapped up in a nice bow. It gives the person name, Mr. Smirga, which validates the comment.

Mr. Santos said Judge Bishop’s ruling revealed flaws in the state’s case against Mr. Skakel.

Mr. Santos and the Skakel family said they would continue to fight until Mr. Skakel was fully vindicated.

“This is the first step in correcting a terrible wrong,” the Skakel family said in a statement. “We look forward to Michael being vindicated and justice finally being served.”

Mr. Skakel was ordered to have no contact with the Moxley family.

He has a 14-year-old son, but, after more than a decade in prison , no home to return to. His lawyer declined to publicly reveal where Mr. Skakel would go once he was released.

While the joy of the Skakel family was evident in the courtroom, Mr. Moxley said he could not see how anyone could be happy about all that has happened.

He said that even if Judge Bishop’s ruling cast doubt on Mr. Skakel’s guilt, it left a cloud of suspicion over his brother Thomas, who was 17 when Ms. Moxley was killed. He was the last person known to have seen her alive.

“It is difficult to fathom how there could be any victory in this,” he said.

Alison Leigh Cowan reported from Stamford, Conn., and Marc Santora from New York.

A version of this article appears in print on November 22, 2013, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: After 11 Years in Prison, Skakel Goes Free on Bail.

      

—-It was a clean article and with only that one bear hug comment, I think the author provided a nice and fair article. I think he kept his bias out of it and just presented the facts. He did not force his beliefs or show an opinion in the article. While it was full of facts, it was also boring as hell.—–

10,000-Year-Old Cave Paintings in Brazil Discovered by Accident

ZME Science  (check this site out: http://www.zmescience.com/. I have bookmarked it for later. I am actually quite curious to see what it has to offer and I only glanced at it, so that makes me wonder what qualities did it posses to draw my interest.)

 

Going back to the site, I don’t find it as exciting as it seems I did earlier, but I would like to find an article and analyze it.

10,000-Year-Old Cave Paintings in Brazil Discovered by Accident

Published on Tue, Nov 19, 2013 by Mihai Andrei

 

This is the article I decided to analyze. By quickly scanning this article, it appears this would not be an editorial article, but in the first sentence I find an opinion word. I decided to go to the bottom and see if there is any info about the author and I found this:

Written by Mihai Andrei

Andrei is no scientist, but from an early age, he has been fascinated by science; that’s why he went to college, and signed up for Geophysics. Feeling that there’s a huge gap between science and average people, he rallied TP, started ZME Science, and gave it a green twist too. “

It’s interesting to find out a bit about the author before you read their article. It turns out this guy looks like he could be a friend of mine. I automatically assumed he was older, sitting at a boring, brown desk with a disconnect to the real person on the street. I have noticed that I often have that perception when I begin to read any article. Until these blogs were started at the beginning of the semester, I never realized I already had a preconceived idea about the author which automatically swayed my thinking about the article before I even read the article. That is quite a disappointing revelation, but I understand what you mean when you discuss how our feelings can be bias before we even realize it.

So now that I know this guy is younger, started this web site, and has written over 2,000 articles, once again I am swayed to think that I like him more now. Human behavior is an odd conception.

So, I will try to put all this information off to the side and read the article for what it is…easier said than done, but I’ll give it a shot.

In quite an interesting discovery, Wildlife Conservation Society biologists have discovered cave paintings made by hunter-gatherers between 10,000 to 4,000 years ago while studying wild animals in the Taboco region.

-The very first thing I notice is the word “interesting”. While I have to agree this story is interesting to me and most likely interesting to a lot of other readers, I am sure that not everybody would agree that this story is “interesting”.

Is it alright for him to use this word? If I were writing this article and trying to stay away from words that declare my feelings, I could possibly re-write the first line and say something like:

–Biologist from Wildlife Conservation Society have accidently discovered cave paintings dated back between 10,000 to 4,000 years ago….hmm…this is harder than I thought. The first sentence needs to be one sentence and the author made the first sentence pretty darn good. Even saying something like –It was quite a discovery…–that may work.

I guess what I am wondering, is when do you include your feelings in a story? This author thinks it’s “interesting”.

What if you were writing this article and you think it’s “amazing”, would it be alright for you to choose that word?

Now I am wondering if this same article can be found in the NYT or WSJ or WP. I will google that next.

To add more mystery to the situation, the discovery was made in 2009, but it has been kept a secret until now – probably because they wanted to make sure there was proper security to protect the cave paintings before releasing the news publicly.

–Of course, the first thing I question is the word “probably”. That word means nothing to me when I’m reading an article and since it was included in this article, I am thinking this is an editorial piece. With that in mind, I will continue to analyze  this article.

Back then, Dr Alexine Keuroghlian of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Brazil Program and her colleagues were conducting surveys of white-lipped peccaries, medium-sized mammals of the family Tayassuidae, or New World pigs. Peccaries are very vulnerable to human activities, especially deforesting and hunting, and their numbers are dwindling all across South America.

 

 

–While I understand this is what the researchers were originally working on when they made the discoveries, does this article need that much explanation about the peccaries? Maybe. And maybe it needs to so it can explain the movement of how these drawings were discovered.

While following radio signals from tracking devices on the peccaries, the team encountered some interesting sandstone formations, including caves containing drawings of animals and geometric figures.

–The one thing I really like about this article is all the names he has to back up his article.

Dr Rodrigo Luis Simas de Aguiar, an archaeologist with the Federal University of Grande Dourados, determined that the drawings were made by hunter gatherers in the area 4.000-10.000 years ago who either occupied the caves, or simply used them for artistic or religious pursuits. The findings have been described in a paper, but it’s in Portuguese, and no Englishtranslation is available at the moment.

THE DRAWINGS

 

The paintings depict a very large assemblage of animals, including armadillos, deer, large cats, birds , and reptiles, as well as human-like figures and geometric symbols. The next step is to conduct cave floor excavations and date the drawings geologically.

–Now this part I find exciting and I am thrilled he has included what the next step will be concerning these drawings.

And now he has included a direct quote that he got from a statement that anyone could use. He didn’t have to include it, but it adds legitimacy to his article.

“These discoveries of cave drawings emphasize the importance of protecting the Cerrado and Pantanal ecosystems, both for their cultural and natural heritage,” Julie Kunen, director of WCS’s Latin America and the Caribbean program, said in a statement. “We hope to partner with local landowners to protect these cave sites, as well as the forests that surround them, so that the cultural heritage and wildlife depicted in the drawings are preserved for future generations.”

Archaeologists still haven’t figured out what exactly what civilization (if any) made the drawings, and they’ve reported a strange mix of styles – the entire assemblage is way more complex than expected, showcasing influences from various areas of Brazil, including something rather similar to the ancient art from the central Brazilian plateau and the more recent, artistic north-eastern styles. Some are created in the so-called Planalto tradition while others, surprisingly, are more similar to the Nordeste or Agreste style drawings.

–I like that he included the origins of where the illustrators may have come from.

All in all, I think this is a pretty good article. I am still a bit confused it this would be considered an editorial piece. I am thinking that it would not be, that he included those few words to add a human touch to the article. I am going to say by using the word “probably” that this would be an opinion piece. Would you agree?

I will now see if the NYT covered this story and compare the two.

These are the prompt words I put into the NYT search engine-Cave Paintings in Brazil-and nothing came up.

I guess the editor choose not to run this story, maybe because it was too sciencey. 

 

Credit: Alexine Keuroghlian/WCS

Written by Mihai Andrei

Andrei is no scientist, but from an early age, he has been fascinated by science; that’s why he went to college, and signed up for Geophysics. Feeling that there’s a huge gap between science and average people, he rallied TP, started ZME Science, and gave it a green twist too. 

Andrei has published 2515 posts on ZME Science .

 

 

 

Oreos OR Cocaine

 

Study: Oreos are more addictive than cocaine

Jake Harris

http://dailycaller.com/2013/10/16/oreos-more-addictive-than-cocaine/

 

-I am going into this article with an open mind. I have no idea what or where this story will go, but I would like to tell you some things I would like to read about.

  1. 1.     My interest would include where did the cocaine come from? Government lab made?
  2. 2.     What was the cookie and cocaine tested on for data?
  3. 3.     Weight issues with Oreos
  4. 4.     Weight loss with cocaine (not really)
  5. 5.     What town did they do this study? Is this because I might judge the area. If they were doing the test in Europe where cocaine is rampant, would I now be biased?

 A recent study released Wednesday by Connecticut College makes the bold claim that Oreos are as addictive as cocaine — at least, in lab rats.

-My immediate search was for the location of where the testing took place. I have no connection with   Connecticut. Does this somehow change the results in my mind? It is cold in Connecticut. Do people tend to eat more cookies or sugary snacks where the region is cooler? (I can find no evidence online that this is true)

Connecticut College psychology professor Joseph Schroeder told CBS News that rats who ate the high-fat cookies and rats who were exposed to cocaine or morphine had the same pleasure center of their brain stimulated.

-Before going on, I absolutely believe the next thing the author will provide is where the “same pleasure center of their brain” is.

“When we looked in the pleasure center of the brain, we found that the Oreo cookies activated the pleasure center more so than cocaine would activate the same center ,” Schroeder said.

-And they didn’t, so I looked it up.

http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/a/a_03/a_03_cr/a_03_cr_que/a_03_cr_que.html

“….Researchers have found that the main centres of the brain’s reward circuit are located along the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens are the two major centres in this circuit, but it also includes several others, such as the septum, the amygdala, the prefrontal cortex, and certain parts of the thalamus. Each of these structures appears to participate in its own way in various aspects of behavioural response.

Moreover, all of these centres are interconnected and innervate the hypothalamus (red arrows), informing it of the presence of rewards. The lateral and ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus are especially involved in this reward circuit…..”

-I know that it would be ridiculous to include this type of information and although I may not know some of the medical words, but I at least it gives me more detail than just “pleasure center”. At this point in the Oreo/cocaine article, I would probably assume the rest of the article is going to be pretty vague, so I would not finish the article. On the other hand, this publication The Daily Caller also has a section called KITTENS, so maybe I wouldn’t be getting my medical information from this web site/ article in the first place.

y’s findings are being used to explain how humans just can’t avoid eating high-fat treats, lending credibility to the oft-used saying that “[Insert food here] is so good, it’s like crack.”

A majority of the people polled on CBS News’s website agree that Oreos are addictive.

-These next two sentences are ridiculous and now I would defiantly consider never reading this publication again. This publication holds no credibility now for their vague statements and downright stupid sentences.

Telling me that “A majority of the people polled on CBS News’s website agree that Oreos are addictive.” Means nothing to me. I don’t know who the people they polled are. They could all be 16 year old boys who eat nonstop. It could be 40-55 depressed women who are overweight and eat high sugary snacks all day. Secondly, who are they to say they are addictive. They are random people who have no training in what is considered addictive. Just because they eat 30 Oreos at one sitting does not mean they are additive. It could mean the person has no self control.

Also, the paragraph before said that it was Oreos that were addicting like cocaine, but the next paragraph said that it is “high-fat treats.” This article is now including every high fat treat which could also include avocados. Are they addicting like cocaine? (I googled it and found no website where there has been discussion concerning avocados and cocaine.)

They should have said “high sugar…and provide the correct words for what an Oreo is called.

(Check out this article I found when I was researching what an oreo is called “high-fat/ high-sugar foods”)

The article is in its entirety at the end of this blog. This article is written better than the previous and includes some of the things I was hoping the first article would deliver.

  (These are silly poll facts to seem like they are legitimate and intelligent. I wonder what there media kit says about who their target audience is.

 I searched for their media kit and found this first:

The Daily Caller is a 24/7 news site committed to providing original reporting, thought-provoking commentary, and breaking news.

-That’s pretty funny.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/footer/advertise-with-us/#ixzz2kSVbjPJY

with this claim. Science blog ZME Science  (check this site out: http://www.zmescience.com/. I have bookmarked it for later. I am actually quite curious to see what it has to offer and I only glanced at it, so that makes me wonder what qualities did it posses to draw my interest.) states that Oreos cannot be classified as being more addictive than cocaine because there haven’t been enough studies done on people with Oreo withdrawals, highlighting the difference between physiological addiction and psychological addiction.

“In the study, they put rats in a maze and showed that they spent the same amount of time on the side where they were awarded with sugary food compared to the side with not-pleasure (that is bland food) compared to the side of the maze where they were awarded with pleasure (via drugs) vs not-pleasure (that is, not drugs). Interesting, but you can’t really go on saying this shows Oreos are like drugs ,” the ZME Science article states.

Yahoo! Health’s Prevention blog also claims that other food groups are more addictive than cookies, including chocolate, french fries, candy and ice cream.

-WOW-

-I cannot believe the very last paragraph they have in this article completely destroys the entire article by saying it has no credibility because of this other website. It makes me wonder if the writer of the crappy article works for ZME Science article. That would have been a very sneaky way to advertise. If I were stupid, I would believe what this article says at the end and I would say “yep, I agree with them ZME people. I’m smart like them because there wasn’t enough test.”. Then would it lead me to their website? If this article I am reading now wants me to stay on their site and continue reading what they have to offer, then providing a link to another publication is about as dumb as you can get. Just as dumb as the original article that stated this entire blog.

And interestingly enough, I could care less about the story topic now. I am more fascinated that the author actually published this and that consumer’s take it seriously.

 Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2013/10/16/oreos-more-addictive-than-cocaine/#ixzz2kSG8ZNf2

 

This article is the other one I found while looking for more information. This is the article I prefer because it has actually facts and uses medically correct words with real studies to back it up. It includes quotes and a background story.

Connecticut College News

 

Student-faculty research shows Oreos are just as addictive as drugs in lab rats

10/15/2013

 

Joseph Schroeder, associate professor of psychology and director of the behavioral neuroscience program, and Lauren Cameron ’14 found that eating Oreos activated more neurons in the brain’s “pleasure center” than exposure to drugs of abuse.

Connecticut College students and a professor of psychology have found “America’s favorite cookie” is just as addictive as cocaine – at least for lab rats. And just like most humans, rats go for the middle first.

In a study designed to shed light on the potential addictiveness of high-fat/ high-sugar foods, Joseph Schroeder, associate professor of psychology and director of the behavioral neuroscience program, and his students found rats formed an equally strong association between the pleasurable effects of eating Oreos and a specific environment as they did between cocaine or morphine and a specific environment. They also found that eating cookies activated more neurons in the brain’s “pleasure center” than exposure to drugs of abuse.  

The results are preliminary and subject to further scientific review.

“Our research supports the theory that high-fat/ high-sugar foods stimulate the brain in the same way that drugs do,” Schroeder said. “It may explain why some people can’t resist these foods despite the fact that they know they are bad for them.”

The research was the brainchild of neuroscience major Jamie Honohan ’13. A scholar in the College’s Holleran Center for Community Action and Public Policy, Honohan was interested in how the prevalence of high-fat and high-sugar foods in low-income neighborhoods contributed to the obesity epidemic.

“My research interests stemmed from a curiosity for studying human behavior and our motivations when it comes to food ,” said Honohan. “We chose Oreos not only because they are America’s favorite cookie, and highly palatable to rats, but also because products containing high amounts of fat and sugar are heavily marketed in communities with lower socioeconomic statuses.”

To test the addictiveness of Oreos, Honohan and a co-researcher, Becca Markson ’13, worked with Schroeder and two other students, Science Leader Gabriela Lopez ’15 and Katrina Bantis ’15, last year to measure the association between “drug” and environment.

On one side of a maze, they would give hungry rats Oreos and on the other, they would give them a control – in this case, rice cakes. (“Just like humans, rats don’t seem to get much pleasure out of eating them,” Schroeder said.) Then, they would give the rats the option of spending time on either side of the maze and measure how long they would spend on the side where they were typically fed Oreos.

While it may not be scientifically relevant, Honohan said it was surprising to watch the rats eat the famous cookie. “They would
break it open and eat the middle first,” she said.

They compared the results of the Oreo and rice cake test with results from rats that were given an injection of cocaine or morphine, known addictive substances, on one side of the maze and a shot of saline on the other. Professor Schroeder is licensed by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to purchase and use controlled substances for research.

The research showed the rats conditioned with Oreos spent as much time on the “drug” side of the maze as the rats conditioned with cocaine or morphine.

Neuroscience major and Science Leader Lauren Cameron ’14 was awarded a Keck Grant, which provides summer research stipends in the sciences to qualified students, to work with Schroeder to continue the research over the summer. They used immunohistochemistry to measure the expression of a protein called c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in the nucleus accumbens, or the brain’s “pleasure center.”

“It basically tells us how many cells were turned on in a specific region of the brain in response to the drugs or Oreos,” said Schroeder.

They found that the Oreos activated significantly more neurons than cocaine or morphine.

“This correlated well with our behavioral results and lends support to the hypothesis that high-fat/ high sugar foods can be thought of as addictive,” said Schroeder.

And that could be a problem for the general public, says Honohan.

“Even though we associate significant health hazards in taking drugs like cocaine and morphine, high-fat/ high-sugar foods may present even more of a danger because of their accessibility and affordability,” she said.

Schroeder will present the research next month at the Society for Neuroscience conference in San Diego, Calif.

 

For media inquiries, please contact:
Amy Martin, 860-439-2526, a.martin@conncoll.edu or Deborah MacDonnell (860) 439-2504, dmacdonn@conncoll.edu

 

CONNECT WITH Dr. Mark Finlay

CONNECT WITH Dr. Mark Finlay

How wonderful that I was able to reCONNECT with Jessica.

I started working on a story about the yarn bombing that is coming up on Nov. 15th and I went to meet with the woman that is hosting the event. Turns out it’s an old friend I hadn’t seen in over 10 years ad she happens to work for Connect now. She used to work for Skirt, but I believe that publication went under.

I’d like to analyze how Jessica covered the story on the death of our AASU professor.

http://www.connectsavannah.com/savannah/history-cut-short/Content?oid=2305488

by Jessica Leigh Lebos

 

History cut short 

Dr. Mark Finlay, 1960-2013

by Jessica Leigh Lebosjll@connectsavannah.com@typeitloud

click to enlarge

  •  
  • Dr. Mark Finlay 1960-2013

By all accounts, Dr. Mark Finlay was a gem of a human being—one of those smart, kind people who couldn’t elicit a mean word or a backhanded insult from even the most cantankerous Savannah citizen.

If you know anything about the cranky tongues in this town, that’s quite an accomplishment.

-Already she has put her stamp on what type of man he was. I’ve never met him, so I am going to take her word for it that he was indeed a “gem of a human being.”

-This just became an editorial piece bc it includes her opinion.

His students respected him. His colleagues admired him. His neighbors liked him. They would have gladly told you that before the news came that the acclaimed history professor had been killed in a car crash last Sunday night on a dark stretch of I-95. Nobody is happy about having to tell it now.

-As soon as I read the first sentence in this paragraph I thought, I hope she has a quote and she does.

-The next to last sentence was a bit confusing for me. I would have reworded that sentence….actually now that I have read it several times, it sounds good. A little tricky at first.

“Mark was a great scholar, teacher and friend,” mourns Tania Sammons, a curator with the Telfair Museums. “I’ll miss talking to him about history and collaborating on history projects, which began when I was a Master’s student years ago at Armstrong.”-

-Good quote. However, I’m not wondering if she still had contact with him right up to his death.

On the faculty of Armstrong Atlantic State University since 1992, Dr. Finlay served as assistant dean of Liberal Arts and garnered top teaching awards at local and state levels. In 2010, he won the top prizefrom the Agricultural History Society for his book about Savannah’s brief foray into latex production, Growing American Rubber: Strategic Plants and the Politics of National Security.

He was an avid sports fan, a world traveler and unrepentant research wonk, softspoken and shy with one of those funny streaks that seemed to pop up unexpectedly, like when he lampooned himself in a beige polyester leisure suit in a photo recently posted on Flickr.

-Okay. So she starts the article with the current situation. She talks about how he was and the death. The next paragraphs sum the history of the professor’s life.

He leaves behind a wife, two sons and a bereft community.

-I think here she again puts the emphasis on the community and its loss. I would like to have a quote from his wife right here. I would like to hear from his family.

“His is one of those great lives cut short,” laments fellow history professor and friend Robert Batchelor, a faculty member at Georgia Southern.

-Big disappointment that she goes straight back into a quote from another prof. Defiantly would have preferred a quote from his wife.

 

The loss of Dr. Finlay also means a sudden vacuum in the conversation about local conservation. He was in the midst of writing a book about the undeveloped islands of Georgia’s coast and how they came to be protected — and how they might still be at risk. He had the uncanny talent of stitching together disparate disciplines to distill the bigger picture, an uncommon trait for a lifelong academic.

“In his writing, our relation to the environment was intertwined with local knowledge, politics, economics, national security and innovation,” continues Batchelor. “These are things we know intuitively but often forget when we think of the environment as a separate issue.”

By documenting the histories of the wild places of Wassaw,CumberlandSt. Catherine’sOssabaw and other sea islands, Finlay shed light on everything from early Native American inhabitants to the role of the paper industry to America’s financial elite. He also gave voice to the nascent coastal environmental movement of the 1950s, a time when Savannah’s liberals and conservatives united to defeat corporate interests that would have sludged up Wassaw Sound for phosphate and built condos on the landfill.

-I love that she included all this information about the book. I was all set to complain that I wish I had more information, but there it is. Great!

But Finlay never abdicated his role as an objective researcher.

-Objective researcher…hmmmm…interesting. Let’s see how she defines that for the reader.

“He was a historian. He did not project his views, he did not have an agenda,” says Dr. Paul Pressly, educational director of the Ossabaw Island Foundation. “By bringing forth the topic, he hoped to influence the discussion.”

-Great definition and with a quote even. She probably got the quote first and then started the quote with the words “objective reader”.

Pressly lauds the work Finlay did with the foundation, bringing back participants of the island’s original Genesis Project and spending hours with Ossabaw’s most vociferous defender and only full-time resident, Sandy West.

Finlay’s rigorous research has brought awareness and authority to the cause, and Pressly hopes that it will be published posthumously. An international environmental symposium on Ossabaw is being planned for 2016 in Finlay’s honor.

-Great that she was able to find something going on in the future. Good researching.

“He was a Renaissance Man — a restless mind that could tie things together in different areas, bring together administration and faculty, environmentalism and industry,” Pressly remembers.

“He understood the long view.”

To underscore that point, Pressly shares a story that took place just a few weeks ago: He was with Finlay and his wife, Kelly Applegate, in Plains, Georgia, where 89 year-old former President Jimmy Carterteaches Sunday School at Maranatha Baptist Church.

“After lunch, Mark did something very touching — he pulled out campaign buttons from 1976 and talked about how as a young teenager in Iowa, he worked for the Carter campaign,” retells Pressly. “He had saved them all those years. President Carter was very moved.”

-Here she puts another compassionate paragraph into her article. This gives him even more heart. Does he need more?

I didn’t know Finlay all that well—we have friends in common, and I worked with Kelly, a talented graphic designer, at another publication years ago. Our kids attended the same school for awhile, and sometimes we’d exchange the apologetic nods of busy grown-ups who would really like to stop and chat one of these days if we could just find the time.

I did get a glimpse of his exceptional way with history when I interviewed him in January for an article about Ossabaw and the rest of the sea islands on the occasion of West’s 100th birthday. We met atSkidaway State Park‘s Big Ferry Trail to put context to content, and as we traipsed through the saw palmettos and curtains of moss, he pointed out a Native American oyster midden here, a decomposing moonshine still there, the centuries piling up in the misty maritime forest.

Without a trace of pedantry, he explained the connection between the untouched marsh and the Rockefellers while invoking cellular biology, loggerhead turtles and Lester Maddox. We also talked kids and chess and even a little UGA football.

-I like that she has had her own experience with the professor and she included it in her article.

I learned more about the Georgia coast in an hour sitting with Dr. Finlay looking out onto the choppy waters of the Skidaway Narrows than I had in the entire time I’ve lived here. I sure do hope to read his book someday; his research may be the reason that future generations will be able to poke their toes into the pristine sand dunes of St. Catherine’s Island or track wild pigs on Ossabaw.

-“ I sure do” I would change that to “I am excited to read….”

I humbly offer my deepest condolences to Dr. Finlay’s family and friends in this difficult time. I’ll also extend a gentle reminder to all of us to hug our loved ones a little tighter, take things a little slower.

And to remember that how much value there is in history, and how much we need those who make it matter.

-Nice way to close the story. She sent out a word to the family and reminded us all to slow down.

-Not only was it a great article, she was able to give us a life lesson too.

Authenticity is Cruicial

http://gawker.com/anthony-hopkins-wrote-bryan-cranston-an-amazing-fan-let-1445080043?utm_campaign=socialflow_gawker_facebook&utm_source=gawker_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

Here is the article in full:

Anthony Hopkins Wrote Bryan Cranston an Amazing Fan Letter

 

Go ahead and add “Breaking Bad superfan” to the list of things you and Sir Anthony Hopkins have in common.

In a rather incredible fan letter that was shared over the weekend by Breaking Bad actor Steven Michael Quezada (DEA agent Steven Gomez), a person claiming to be Hopkins could barely contained his gushing as he confessed to having just finished a two-week “marathon” of every Breaking Bad episode in existence (he downloaded the last season on “AMAZON”).

“I have never watched anything like it. Brilliant!” writes “Tony Hopkins” in a letter directed at the show’s star, Bryan Cranston . “Your performance as Walter White was the best acting I have seen – ever.”

“I know there is so much smoke blowing and sickening bullshit in this business, and I’ve sort of lost belief in anything really,” Hopkins continues. “But this work of yours is spectacular – absolutely stunning.”

A few hours after it began making the Internet rounds, the letter and the post it rode in on disappeared without a trace from Quezada’s Facebook page (a tweet about the letterwas also deleted).

Many were already skeptical of the letter ‘s authenticity, but Quezada’s scrubbing made the incredible claim even less credible.

Which is why we reached out to a source close to Hopkins who confirmed to us that theletter was indeed written by the legendary thespian in the flesh.

So please feel free to enjoy the rest of the letter, which you will undoubtedly find yourself reading in the voice of Hannibal Lecter:

Dear Mister Cranston.

I wanted to write you this email – so I am contacting you through Jeremy Barber – I take it we are both represented by UTA . Great agency.

I’ve just finished a marathon of watching “BREAKING BAD” – from episode one of the First Season – to the last eight episodes of the Sixth Season. (I downloaded the last season on AMAZON) A total of two weeks (addictive) viewing.

I have never watched anything like it. Brilliant!

Your performance as Walter White was the best acting I have seen – ever.

I know there is so much smoke blowing and sickening bullshit in this business, and I’ve sort of lost belief in anything really.

But this work of yours is spectacular – absolutely stunning. What is extraordinary, is the sheer power of everyone in the entire production. What was it? Five or six years in the making? How the producers (yourself being one of them), the writers, directors, cinematographers…. every department – casting etc. managed to keep the discipline and control from beginning to the end is (that over used word) awesome.

From what started as a black comedy, descended into a labyrinth of blood, destruction and hell. It was like a great Jacobean, Shakespearian or Greek Tragedy.

If you ever get a chance to – would you pass on my admiration to everyone – Anna Gunn, Dean Norris , Aaron Paul , Betsy Brandt, R.J. Mitte, Bob Odenkirk , Jonathan Banks , Steven Michael Quezada – everyone – everyone gave master classes of performance … The list is endless.

Thank you. That kind of work/artistry is rare, and when, once in a while, it occurs, as in this epic work, it restores confidence.

You and all the cast are the best actors I’ve ever seen.

That may sound like a good lung full of smoke blowing. But it is not. It’s almost midnight out here in Malibu, and I felt compelled to write this email.

Congratulations and my deepest respect. You are truly a great, great actor.

Best regards

Tony Hopkins.

This is what I like about this article:

The most important thing the Gawker did was investigate if this letter was real or not.

“Which is why we reached out to a source close to Hopkins who confirmed to us that theletter was indeed written by the legendary thespian in the flesh.”

 

There is no way they would post this if they had not found a credible source, right?